PAST CONTESTS | 2016 | BEAM ME UP COFFEE

BEAM ME UP COFFEE

Creative Circus: Gil Templeton, Hollis Griffith, Kate Lewkowicz, Dean Coots


Even though your standard K-­‐Cup bulk packaging is minimalistic, it’s also pretty boring and nondescript. These boxes are usually relegated to the pantry or cabinet, because they aren’t something people want on display in their beautiful kitchens.

Our main goal with Bean Me Up Coffee was to make attractive K-­‐Cup packaging that people would love to display beside their Keurig on the counter. Stacking the K-­‐Cups on top of each other made our package tall and slim, not short and stocky. This way, it doesn’t take up much countertop space and compliments other accessories people have in their kitchen.

We didn’t want to add a bunch of packaging to accomplish our goal, so the box is thin and flat to minimize surface area. The minimalistic packaging is both recyclable and made from recycled materials. The cardboard has been aggregated from post-­‐ consumer waste, and is easy to recycle again.

Outside of appearance, we wanted packaging that people would enjoy interacting with. Our five layers (each containing two K-­‐Cups) allow users to see exactly how many cups are left. The cups are always organized, never loose or rolling around in the box.

We decided to create a brand of coffee because we didn’t want to feel limited by colors, marks, and type that existing brands have to use. We thought Bean Me Up was an interesting way to think about how coffee affects you. You go from a groggy, mundane existence where people generally annoy you, to a new place where things function swiftly and smoothly, as if you’ve been transported.

The design is inspired by retro sci-­‐fi memorabilia and graphic posters. We chose to use coffee’s organic color pallet, which drew us toward a more retro design instead of something contemporary. The triangle imagery is reminiscent of a tractor beam coming from a space ship. It also reflects the gradual build of energy experienced when drinking coffee. The speckled texture is borrowed from the appearance of scattered coffee grounds and a starry night sky.